CFP: State Socialism, Heritage Experts and Internationalism in Heritage Protection after 1945

Join us in Exeter for our collaborative conference with the Herder Institute exploring the rising contributions of socialist and non-aligned actors...

Join us for our conference on the “Other Globalisers”, Exeter 6-7 July 2017

The Other Globalisers: How the Socialist and the Non-Aligned World Shaped the Rise of Post-War Economic Globalisation Location: Exeter University,...

The Future of the Past: Why the End of Yugoslavia is Still Important

By Ljubica Spaskovska A new socialist model is emerging in the western Balkans. Can its political vocabulary transcend the ethno-national dividing...

Writing Human Rights into the History of State Socialism

By Ned Richardson-Little The collapse of the Communist Bloc in 1989-1991 is viewed as one of the great triumphs of...

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Event Repository: Relevant Call for Papers, Conferences and Events

Below you will find links to other relevant conferences, call for papers and events organised by other institutions and organisations:

  • Thu
    19
    Feb
    2015
    Fri
    20
    Feb
    2015

    POPULAR GEOPOLITICS IN RUSSIA AND POST-SOVIET EASTERN EUROPE

    University College London, London

    Submission deadline: October 17, 2014

    This workshop is intended to advance research into the societal or ‘popular’ dimension of geopolitics in Russia and post-Soviet Eastern Europe.

    Participants are invited to tackle the following interrelated questions:

    • How do citizens (‘the public’) in Russia, Ukraine, Belarus and other post-Soviet states perceive ‘the West’ and its constituent parts (the European Union, the USA and other individual countries), their regional neighbourhood and their place on the geopolitical map?
    • How are geopolitical narratives sustained and/or challenged by domestic and transnational media, popular culture, government policies (including education and public diplomacy) and processes outside state control (such as travel and increasing internet use)?
    • How do public attitudes reflect, contradict and/or shape official geopolitical rhetoric and policy choices?
    • How might theoretical approaches and evidence from different disciplines and geographical areas be combined to further our understanding of such issues?

    Contributions are invited from all relevant disciplines, particularly Political Science and International Relations, Geography, Anthropology, Sociology, Education and Media/Communication/Cultural Studies.

    Call for Papers: Popular Geopolitics in Russia and Post-Soviet Eastern Europe

  • Sun
    01
    Mar
    2015
    Tue
    03
    Mar
    2015

    LAW IN TRANSITION

    XXIst Annual Forum of Young Legal Historians 6th Berg Institute International Conference, Tel Aviv

    Submission deadline: November 1, 2014

    The upcoming XXIst Annual Forum of the Association of Young Legal Historians aims at a comprehensive discussion of law in transition. A wide variety of transitions of historical significance can be explored: political, economic, social, cultural, and more. “Law”—legal symbols, discourses, players, institutions, theories, and texts—has played a significant role in historical transitions, and legal historians have been crucial in exploring its multiple and contradictory effects. The stakes are not just historical, but current: these studies encourage transitions in the way law itself is conceived, theorised, and researched.

    We invite young legal historians to present papers dealing with any aspect of law in transition. (Proposals on other topics will also be considered)

    Call for Papers: Law in Transition

  • Fri
    27
    Mar
    2015

    TRANSNATIONAL CONTACTS IN THE SOCIALIST WORLD

    Center for the Humanities, Tufts University Massachusetts

    Submission deadline: January 7, 2015

    In 1961, Nikita Khrushchev hailed the development of a “world socialist system,” which he defined as “a social, economic, and political community of free, sovereign nations [. . .] united by common interests and goals, by the close ties of international socialist solidarity.” This day-long workshop will bring together an interdisciplinary group of early-career scholars to examine the socialist system from a global and transnational perspective. Among the questions to be discussed: how did transnational cultural, interpersonal, and economic contacts between socialist countries contribute to the construction of the “world socialist system”? How did this system impact the everyday lives of ordinary citizens? How did national histories and cultures shape transnational relations in the socialist world?  How does the theory and methodology of transnational history apply to the study of socialist countries?

    → Call for Papers: Transnational Contacts

  • Thu
    16
    Apr
    2015
    Fri
    17
    Apr
    2015

    25 YEARS AFTER THE TRANSFORMATION: LAW, LEGAL CULTURE AND SOCIETY IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE BETWEEN CONTINUITY AND DISCONTINUITY

    Masaryk University in cooperation with the University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Faculty in Wrocław, Brno, Czech Republic

    Registration open: March 2015

    Quarter of a century ago, at the turn of 1989 and 1990, Central and Eastern Europe – then known as the ‘Soviet bloc’ – experienced an unprecedented socio-economic and political transformation. The hitherto existing system, known as ‘Actually Existing Socialism’, crumbled, and countries of the region started a transition towards a capitalist market economy and a political democracy.

    The aim of the conference is to focus on the socio-legal aspects of the transformation. Whilst some areas, such as lustration and transitional justice, have been already thoroughly researched, others such as the impact of transformation upon private law, procedural law or general administrative law still remain to be analysed in more detail. In particular, an aspect which is generally neglected in contemporary scholarship are so-called ‘legal survivals’ of the socialist period, that is those legal institutions which have not been removed after transformation but still remain in place. Furthermore, some scholars argue that there is a strong continuity in legal culture, such as attitudes of judges and scholars to legal interpretation or generally held views on the place of law in society. Our aim is to invite a broad outlook upon the socio-legal aspects of transformation, including the role of law in the transformation of social conciousness, the construction of collective identities and the framing of social dialogue.

    Conference Registration: 25 Years After the Transformation

  • TALKING ABOUT ECONOMICS IN THE SOCIALIST WORLD (1920s – 1980s)

    Global Studies Institute of the University of Geneva, Geneva

    Submission deadline: December 1, 2014

    In 1989-1991 many countries in Eastern Europe and Asia, formerly constituents of the socialist world, underwent a profound transition abandoning both the socialist economic and political order as well as rejecting the Marxist-Leninist ideological axioms. Crucially, however, the economics of socialism from their conceptualisation and their first implementation after 1917 up to the 1990s had remained challenged and the subject of political and scientific discussion in the socialist states.

    The colloquium will focus on the discourses about the socialist economy and their substantial but often unknown or insufficiently explored contents and the multiple ideas about the economy expressed by contemporaries. Thereby the intensity of debates, different conceptualisations and the abundance of economic reflection in the socialist world will be highlighted. The research focus will lie on the history of concepts and the semantics of economics in socialism and on the actors elaborating socialist economic theory, their networks and milieus. This colloquium intends to challenge both the assumption of a monolithic character of the hypothetical socialist economic model, incapable of reform or adaptation to the changing economic environment as well as the disqualification of “revisionist” economists, rejected from the mainstream in the socialist countries at the time.

    Call for Papers: Talking About Economics in the Socialist World

  • Fri
    08
    May
    2015
    Sat
    09
    May
    2015

    MEMORIES AND IDENTITIES IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

    The 2015 Annual Conference of the Irish Association for Russian, Central and East European Studies, organized by the Department of Russian and Slavonic Studies, the Center for European Studies, the Trinity Long Room Hub, and the Irish Association for Russian, Central and East European Studies, Dublin

    Submission deadline: November 14, 2014

    The categories ‘memory’ and ‘identity’ have enjoyed significant scholarly attention in the past few decades. The upsurge of interest in memory and identity studies has affected a wide range of disciplines, including history, cultural studies, sociology, political science, and so on, and has inspired academic ventures of a truly interdisciplinary character. The ‘memory boom’ in the humanities triggered the bourgeoning of collaborative research projects, and resulted in numerous publications on the subject. Memories of traumatic events of the recent past—the Holocaust, World War II and Stalinist terror—and their impact on the transformation of individual as well as collective identities have been in the limelight of research, especially since the collapse of communist regimes in Central and Eastern Europe. Still, there are many possible ways for raising new questions, and there are several themes that could be explored further, including memories of normality and their impact on the shaping of identities; the influence of postcolonial criticism on memory/identity studies; the transnational circulation of narratives; or the ramifications of the transformation of memory studies.

    Call for Papers: Memories and Identities in Central and Eastern Europe

  • Fri
    15
    May
    2015
    Sun
    17
    May
    2015

    NEW APPROACHES TO TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE: THE ROLE OF HISTORICAL NARRATIVES AFTER PERIODS OF TRANSITIONS IN ASIA AND EUROPE AFTER 1945

    Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe in a Global Context”, Universität Heidelberg, JRG “Transcultural Justice”; in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, Heidelberg

    Submission deadline: October 20, 2014

    The history of every country contains periods of transition: from war to peace, from a previous to a succeeding government, from an autocratic regime to democratic representation, from colonial domination to independence. Turbulent transitions are often times of violence and chaos conducive to violations of human rights and international humanitarian law. A recurring demand in many transitions has been the need to establish a historical record of the events leading to the unrest and to document the reproachable actions committed during the period in question. Truth in this context mainly denotes the act of historical record-setting but more often than not, what “the truth” is, is fiercely contested. In the past, various strategies have been pursued to generate historical narratives for transitional periods; each of these strategies, so it seems, comes with certain problematic aspects attached to it. A very salient example is the attempt to set a historical record through criminal prosecution of those responsible for serious crimes.

    This workshop seeks to broaden the discussion by placing special emphasis on the processes of transition that have occurred in both Europa and Asia. To contrast transitional processes in different regions will allow for easier recognition of similarities and differences and challenge the often voiced opinion that the particular historical circumstances found in each nation affected by turmoil make every transition unique to the point where it completely defies comparison.

    Call for Papers: New Approaches to Transitional Justice

     

  • Tue
    19
    May
    2015
    Thu
    21
    May
    2015

    RETHINKING NEGATIVITY 9th International Conference of the Series Iberian and Slavonic Cultures in Contact and Comparison

    Faculty of Letters, University of Lisbon

    Submission deadline: February 15, 2015

    The main objective of the Conference is to map the expressions of negation and their cultural meanings within the Iberian-Slavonic perspective. While revisiting Studies on Negation/Negation Studies, there will be a particular focus on two leading aspects of negation: ANTI and CONTRA. An additional goal will be to search for the middle ground between these two poles of negativity, i.e. between ANTI, understood as a more aggressive and pro-destructive attitude, and CONTRA, seen as a kind of rationale for the process of negation, more readily ending in a compromise and in a conflict solution. Thus, the transition from ANTI to CONTRA will be our main focus this year.
    These two objectives will make our debate complement the current CLEPUL-FLUL international project “Culture(s) in the Negative”, accessible at http://www.culturasemnegativo.net/Ptg/ViewContent/1, so we welcome all Iberian, Portuguese, Lusophone, Hispanic, Ibero-American and Slavonic case studies, above all (although not limited to) Iberian-Slavonic interactions resulting in attitudes of negation and processes of their overcoming.

    → Call for Papers: Rethinking Negativity (pdf)

    Paper Proposal Form (doc)

  • Sun
    31
    May
    2015
    Wed
    03
    Jun
    2015

    YOUNG RESEARCHERS CONFERENCE – WRITING THE PAST/RIGHTING MEMORY

    Havighurst Center for Russian and Post-Soviet Studies, Miami University Cuma, Italy

    Submission deadline: Abstracts October 1, 2014; Papers April 15, 2015

    This conference will focus on the region of Russia, Eastern Europe and/or Eurasia and will include discussion on memory and history, remembering and forgetting, commemoration, institutionalization and marketing of memory in the context of various social and political processes such as migration and lustration, and comprise genres from memoirs to laws to investigative journalism to textbooks, film, and novels. The conference will feature two keynote speakers, Grigorii Chkhartishvili and Alexander Etkind, and will be organized by panels suggested and put together by the Havighurst Center Faculty.

    Call for Papers: Writing the Past/Righting Memory

  • Fri
    19
    Jun
    2015
    Sat
    20
    Jun
    2015

    THIRD EUROACADEMIA INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE IDENTITIES AND IDENTIFICATIONS: POLITICIZED USES OF COLLECTIVE IDENTITIES

    Lucca, Italy

    Deadline for Paper Proposals: 15 May 2015

    Identity is one of the crown jeweleries in the kingdom of ‘contested concepts’. The idea of identity is conceived to provide some unity and recognition while it also exists by separation and differentiation. Few concepts were used as much as identity for contradictory purposes. From the fragile individual identities as self-solidifying frameworks to layered in-group identifications in families, orders, organizations, religions, ethnic groups, regions, nation-states, supra-national entities or any other social entities, the idea of identity always shows up in the core of debates and makes everything either too dangerously simple or too complicated. Constructivist and de-constructivist strategies have led to the same result: the eternal return of the topic. Some say we should drop the concept, some say we should keep it and refine it, some say we should look at it in a dynamic fashion while some say it’s the reason for resistance to change.

  • Fri
    03
    Jul
    2015
    Sat
    04
    Jul
    2015

    WRITING AND SCREENING SOCIALISMS IN AN ENTANGLED WORLD

    Universität Tübingen

    Submission deadline: February 28, 2015

    Socialism is one of the paradigms that shaped the global 20th century. While it is characterized by a transcultural, universalizing utopia, socialism has actually manifested itself in a large variety of local concepts that modify, alter, adapt and localize its universalisms in time and space (e.g.Soviet-style communism, Western socialist movements, African socialism or its North Korean and Chinese versions). Socialism as an idea has been spread all over the world, regardless of whether a given society has defined itself as socialist or not, whether it was a real life experiment in society or a cultural counter concept to local or transnational power structures (such as
    imperialism and colonialism).

    The workshop aims to bring together scholars from different disciplinary contexts such as film, art, literature or intellectual history in order to ask for possible routes of transnational entanglements as a result of socialism.

    Leading questions could be:

    • How are socialisms formed locally theoretically or discursively and expressed aesthetically?
    • Which concepts, texts, aesthetics and discursive formations were exchanged, and which were the routes of exchange? Which local concepts were shaped or reinterpreted such as for instance ‘protosocialist’ ones which are thus brought into a dialogue with the rest of the world?
    • What about the vexed question of representation and othering within socialisms and their global entanglements?
    • How can we sketch the range of the socialist paradigm not from an ideological point of view, but from one of cultural studies both on transnational and local levels?
    • To what degree did the socialist experiment of the Soviet Union and the concepts it developed (e.g., Gor’kijs project of world literature, manifestations of multinationality in literature, film and the arts or aesthetic concepts such as socialist realism) impact global socialisms?
    • Which other points of contact, routes of exchange and/or possibilities for comparison can be found (e.g., the non-aligned movement, questions of language and translation or the liberation movements)?
    • Which other models can be traced apart from the Soviet Union?
    • Where are points of (aesthetic) resistance to be found, either for or against socialisms?
    • How is worldwide socialism connected with questions of mediality (cf. R. Debray, who situates socialism in the “graphosphere”)?
    • What are the legacies of all these dynamics in contemporary societies?

     

    Call for Papers: Writing and Screening Socialisms in an Entangled World

  • Thu
    27
    Aug
    2015
    Sat
    29
    Aug
    2015

    ORIENTALISM, COLONIAL THINKING AND THE FORMER SOVIET PERIPHERY Exploring Bias and Stereotype Representations of Eastern and Central Europe, the Caucasus, and Central Asia

    Vilnius University

    Submission deadline: April 10, 2015

    The Ukrainian crisis has placed the entire post-communist world back at the very centre of global debates in the media, politics and academia. Concepts such as sovereignty of post-Soviet and post-communist states have been brought into question once again, alongside the historical development, international alignment and aspirations of state actors in the region.

    In this context, a narrative of “Russian interests versus Western interests/values” seems to have gained currency in Western media and political discourses. Smaller actors of Eastern and Central Europe, Central Asia, the Baltics and the Caucasus see their perspectives ignored or put on a secondary level. This has led some scholars to suggest the existence among Western and Russian commentators of a “colonial”, “Orientalist” bias that favours the former imperial “centre” and sees formerly subaltern actors as passive entities in a greater game, giving a stereotypical and demeaning image of such countries and their people. This in turn leaves countries of the former Czarist and Soviet peripheries unable to influence the mainstream debate and to present a self-centred approach in a world in which perceptions and narratives more and more legitimize actions in international relations.

    The purpose of the conference is to provide an academic framework for the discussion of these ideas and put them to the test of peer debate. The goal is to discuss the relevance of Post-Colonial Studies to Post-Communist Studies and hopefully open an innovative chapter in the academic understanding of the Post-Communist World.

    Call for Papers: Orientalism, Colonial Thinking and the Former Soviet Periphery

     

  • Tue
    01
    Sep
    2015
    Thu
    03
    Sep
    2015

    ENCOUNTERING PERPETRATORS OF MASS KILLINGS, POLITICAL VIOLENCE AND GENOCIDE

    University of Winchester

    Submission deadline: March 31, 2015

    The 20th & 21st centuries have borne witness to mass killings, political violence & genocide. As we move into the new millennium the people who have orchestrated & participated in such acts remain figures of fascination & of revulsion in Western society. Yet despite this enduring fascination, and the importance of understanding the dynamics of violence, there is a reluctance in the public sphere and in education to address the complexities of engaging with or representing these perpetrators.

    This reluctance poses the question of just how much is known or understood about those who commit such acts. This interdisciplinary conference aims to confront difficult questions about perpetrators through an exploration of the topic in a variety of memory spaces including literature, film, museums, education, trials & the media.

    Call for Papers: Encountering Perpetrators

  • Thu
    03
    Sep
    2015
    Sun
    06
    Sep
    2015

    SITES OF MEMORY OF SOCIALISM AND COMMUNISM IN EUROPE

    International Postgraduate Conference organised by Universities of Basel and Bern Schloss Munchenwiler, near Bern

    Submission deadline: January 31, 2015

    Twenty-five years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, the history of socialism and communism still presents itself as one of the most polarizing and controversial themes in Europe’s culture of memory. While some countries of the former Eastern Bloc utilise their socialist past in the formation of national identities, others tend to construct nostalgic memories of their lived experiences in socialist times.

    This international postgraduate conference will discuss Europe’s diverging cultures of memory of socialism and communism from the late nineteenth until the early twenty-first century in a comparative perspective. It will analyse “realms” or “sites of memory” (in the sense of Pierre Nora’s concept of lieux de mémoire) in Western and Eastern Europe as symbolic representations of the memory of socialism and communism.

    Call for Papers: Sites of Memory of Socialism and Communism in Europe

     

  • Thu
    08
    Oct
    2015
    Fri
    09
    Oct
    2015

    INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE IN THE SHADOW OF THE COLD WAR: DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM IN THE FORMER COMMUNIST COUNTRIES

    The Institute of National Remembrance – Commission for the Prosecution of Crimes against the Polish Nation, Warsaw, Poland

    Submission deadline: March 21, 2015

    International terrorism paralyzed the societies of Western Europe in the 70’s and 80’s. Aircraft hijackings, bombings, and assassinations were part of daily, brutal reality. The hostile acts were organized by separatist movements, leftists, rightists, and Middle-Eastern terrorist organizations. The Communist mass media propaganda often alleged that international terrorism was a result of social inequality and instability in capitalist states. In contrast to Western Europe, the countries ruled by Communist parties were presented as oases of calm where the threat of terrorism did not exist.

    The 25th anniversary of the Autumn of Nations (1989) provides a great opportunity to analyze the phenomenon of international terrorism during the Cold War period.

    Why did countries ruled by the Communists cooperate with terrorist organizations? Were their secret ties based on ideological, geopolitical or economic grounds? What was the role of the USSR in such collaborations? Did the authorities in Moscow recommend contacts with terrorists, or was it left as an individual matter for every government? Was terrorism perceived as a useful tool to destabilize Western countries? The least known aspects are related to the extreme manifestations of social resistance to the Communist authorities, which could be interpreted as domestic terrorism.

    Call for Papers: In the Shadow of the Cold War

  • Wed
    14
    Oct
    2015
    Sat
    17
    Oct
    2015

    ENTANGLED HISTORIES, MULTIPLE GEOGRAPHIES

    International Scientific Thematic Conference, EAHN 2015 Belgrade, Serbia

    Submission deadline: February 2015

    The EAHN 2015 Belgrade Conference: Entangled Histories, Multiple Geographies aims to explore how different discourses emerged within architectural historiography and have both constructed and reproduced multiple identities, histories and perspectives on culture, nature and society. It also aims to apprehend the complex hierarchic articulation of these discourses, in terms of dominancy and peripherality, normativity and transfers.

    The principal aim of the conference is to shed light on how different interpretations of architecture and the built environment have contributed to different readings of history, culture, nature and society, either simultaneously or in alternation.

    Special attention will be given to addressing conflicting and complementary views, explanatory systems and theories that stem from understanding and interpreting the past by means of architecture. By “entangled histories” we mean architecture as both a prerequisite to and an instrument in shaping and understanding different or even competing histories of the peoples and places, while “multiple geographies” refers to the roles of the built environment in constructing and interpreting time frames and spatial scales, as well as cultural and political entities in which these histories unfold.

    Call for Papers: Entangled Histories, Multiple Geographies

     

  • Thu
    12
    Nov
    2015
    Sat
    14
    Nov
    2015

    Alternative Global Geographies, Imagining and Re-Imagining the World late 19th century - present day

    Leipzig

    Deadline for Paper Proposals: 27 July 2015

    Conference of the Research Network “Socialism Goes Global” (http://socialismgoesglobal.exeter.ac.uk/ )

    In contrast to public claims of the early 1990s, space and geographies have not lost their central role in defining an ever more globalized world. We still live in territorialized spaces: not only in the narrow sense of states and societies that reside within their borders, but also geographies and spatial formats on regional and world scales. Research in the aftermath of the spatial turn in the humanities and social sciences is increasingly drawing our attention to the importance of understanding large-scale spatial dynamics for global history.

    Many influential paradigms, often emerging from metropolitan cores or centres of the Cold War, have emerged to make sense of an increasingly interconnected world. These have included Euro- and other ‘centric’ centre-periphery models, the idea of the Anglophone or Francophone worlds, the tricontinental model, World Systems Theory, or the division of the globe into the First, Second, and Third Worlds, or the ‘Global North and South’. Such ideas came not only from the academy (in e.g. geography, area studies, history, economics, anthropology) but also from the work of political, economic and cultural actors. This conference will explore such attempts to make sense of the world on a regional or global scale, and explore how such ideas have been used to make sense of, and organize, power relations, cultural encounters and economic connections.

    Call for Papers: Imagined Geographies

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